- miniszterelnok.hu - https://www.miniszterelnok.hu/prime-minister-viktor-orbans-speech-at-the-inauguration-of-the-varpalota-bypass-on-route-8/ -

Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s speech at the inauguration of the Várpalota bypass on Route 8

Good morning, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Allow me to welcome the people of Várpalota and Pétfürdő. I can see that there are some people here from Veszprém, as well as from Fehérvár [Székesfehérvár]. I also wish to extend my warmest greetings to the mayors. Before I deliver my official inauguration speech written for this occasion, I’d like to make a personal observation. Mayor Cser-Palkovics will obviously understand what I’m talking about, as I hail from the town neighbouring the one he is now mayor of. To this day I retain a childhood vivid memory of us regularly coming over this way, and driving through Várpalota. From one perspective this was an unreasonable thing to do, because with more than 19,000 vehicles using that route every day, we knew that people here who wanted to live in peace resented us – those who drove through their town. But an even more depressing memory is that on the approaches to the town there were always police officers posted to fine drivers – and they were unavoidable. The country’s hardest-hearted police officers served here and, through our payments to the law enforcement agencies, we residents of Fehérvár also made a major contribution to raising the funds which enabled construction of this bypass.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

As regards today’s occasion, I wish to welcome you on behalf of the Hungarian government. I am glad that we now have the opportunity to repay a sizeable debt to Várpalota. The building of a bypass here is a plan which the town’s residents have had for a long time. This is no surprise, as who would want to live alongside a main road carrying twenty thousand vehicles a day? As we’ve heard, this not only created noise, and not only air pollution, but was also dangerous. We are now standing here because the people of Várpalota wisely sent a representative to the Hungarian parliament – Mr. Károly Kontrát – and elected town leaders – and we also wish to thank Márta for her efforts – who badgered the Government until they achieved what was needed by Várpalota and its residents. And they successfully fought for every item, one by one.

Of course today we’re handing over a bypass, but let us not forget that MVM Zrt. will complete seven solar power projects in your county, in Veszprém County – two of them in Várpalota. We’re building swimming baths and we’ve refurbished the hospital at a cost of 800 million forints, but, as we heard from Károly, there are still a great many problems. So the people of Várpalota have further plans, because they believe that there is plenty more work for the Government to do. I’ve done my sums: in Várpalota’s schools we’ve implemented developments totalling 465 million forints. We’ve spent 150 million forints on the restoration of Thury Castle, and we’ve recommended spending 464 million forints on development of Zichy Castle and tourist facilities for the Trianon Museum. And before coming out here, I had a meeting with the Mayor. We agreed to prepare a separate development plan for Thury Castle, independently of the relevant national programme, so that the town can better explore the inherent economic and tourism opportunities. And we’re now handing over the 9.4-kilometre bypass relief road which the Government has had built to a budget of 28 billion forints.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

This is a busy road. While it has brought the townspeople great inconvenience, this is also a sign that Várpalota is in an excellent location: more or less halfway on a route between Veszprém and Székesfehérvár. Our goal – and I hope we have now managed to achieve it – has been to enable the people of Várpalota to enjoy the advantages of their excellent geographical location, without its disadvantages. The safety of the people of Várpalota and their improved quality of life were the argument that Mr. Kontrát presented to the Government, and these considerations were decisive in convincing us that nothing should prevent a bypass being built.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

In addition to the safety and comfort of the citizens, I would like to say a few words about another important consideration behind decisions on projects of this nature. That consideration is competitiveness. I’m convinced that by completing this road we are making Várpalota and the entire region more competitive. In the modern world excellent infrastructure forms the basis of competitiveness. Our plan is to link every town and city to the national transport network, to bring motorways closer to everyone, and to take motorways all the way to the borders.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Since 2010 some 670 kilometres of new road have been built in Hungary, at a cost of approximately 1,200 billion forints. Of these, 389 kilometres have been new dual carriageways, 164 kilometres have been new trunk roads and 119 kilometres secondary roads. By 2022 a further 900 kilometres of dual carriageway and motorway will be completed in Hungary. We sincerely hope that we will be the ones inaugurating those as well; but we will be able to tell you more about that on 9 April.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have also provided for maintaining the existing road network. Almost 4,000 kilometres of road has been upgraded; despite this, around the country there are still a great many complaints. In the future we’ll have to spend more on the maintenance of the existing road network. Around one hundred thousand people live along the Székesfehérvár–Várpalota–Veszprém axis, and along that route there are hundreds of businesses – including many large companies. With this road we have now created a dual carriageway bypassing settlements on a route linking Székesfehérvár – and thereby the M7 motorway – with Veszprém. In continuation of this section, construction of the link between the M8, Körmend and Rábafüzes has also begun. With this development we are improving the quality of life for one hundred thousand people and the competitiveness of thousands of businesses. This section of road also brings within reach our near-term plan, or goal, of turning the Székesfehérvár–Várpalota–Veszprém axis into one of the flagships of the Hungarian economy.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

This will happen when each element in this axis is strong on its own. There’s no need to talk at length about the performance of Székesfehérvár: it is a strong city, full of vitality. Veszprém, too, has strengthened greatly through the Modern Cities Programme, and is being given all the support it needs to grow into an economic hub. As part of our plans for the next term of government we shall focus on villages and medium-sized towns. The essence of the development programme for medium-sized towns will be provided by towns like yours – like Várpalota.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

At the same time – regardless of the election campaign, but very clearly in its shadow – I should also mention that it would be pointless to have plans for road construction, infrastructure, flagship developments, medium-sized towns and modern villages, if we were required to spend money not on the development of Hungary, but on migration. We must talk about this frankly and openly. The reality is that if plans from Brussels which seek to turn Hungary into an immigrant country are forced upon us, the financial foundations of every development will be endangered. Migration means integration – which costs an enormous amount of money. If Hungary becomes – or is turned into – an immigrant country, we’ll have to use the development funds for the Hungarian regions and Hungary’s medium-sized towns mostly on integration and the building of an immigrant country. I would like to remind everyone that Austria and Bavaria are not far from here; and if you go there you can see for yourselves what an enormous percentage of financial resources is consumed in the building of an immigrant country, even in rich nations. That would crush Hungary. If we had to spend an annual amount of some nine million forints per head on immigrants we would have to set aside all our future development plans, all pension increases and all family support.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I shall not even elaborate here on the associated deterioration in public security and the threat of terrorism: now I’m only talking about the economic implications. Quite simply, Hungary could not endure this. Immediately in its first year, the operation of an immigrant country would require a sum of around 100 billion forints. I suggest that we use the funds at our disposal for purposes which indeed serve the best interests of the Hungarians living here. It is therefore a matter of no small consequence where the celebrations will be on 8 April: in Várpalota or in Brussels. I suggest celebrations in Várpalota, Veszprém, Székesfehérvár and Budapest. And may the celebrations of the Hungarian people fill the night air!

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Finally nothing more remains for me to do other than thank all the engineers and workers who took part in construction of this road, and who built this section on time and to excellent standards. Thank you very much. Without them, all the Government’s good intentions, and the efforts of the excellent Member of Parliament and the ever supportive Mayor would have been in vain: we wouldn’t have been able to complete this work. But we did it together and we can tick it off our list: this task has been accomplished.

Go for it Várpalota, go for it Hungary!